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1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, surgeon a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, and as the drill is rotated, the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, surgeon a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, and as the drill is rotated, the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, surgeon a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, and as the drill is rotated, the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.

1576025WE OFFER THREE TYPES OF WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

There are three types of water treatment systems commonly used in private homes to treat water for a variety of contaminants: water filtration, tablets reverse osmosis and ion exchange. It may be necessary to remove a contaminant because it’s unhealthful to consume. Some examples are arsenic, one health nitrate and volatile organic compounds. Or you may want to remove something that is simply undesirable because it changes the taste of your water, order makes your water hard, or stains your clothing. Iron, manganese, calcium and magnesium are examples of aesthetic contaminants that affect some of these properties of water and that homeowners often seek to remove.


WATER FILTRATION

Water Filtration is the simplest method of treating water. Water is forced through some physical barrier, with larger particles either “sticking” to the media, or they simply can’t fit through the pore spaces in the media and are “trapped”. Activated carbon filters have tremendous surface areas for contaminants to adhere to. They are effective at removing many contaminants that change the taste and odor of water, especially organic compounds. They are also very good at removing some radioactive elements like radon and uranium. Carbon filters are not effective at removing most inorganic compounds and should not be relied upon to remove arsenic, nitrates, or other inorganics. Finally, filters should not be used to remove anything that’s dissolved in water. It was a chemical reaction that caused the contaminants to dissolve, and will likely require a chemical reaction (ion exchange) or filtration at the atomic scale (reverse osmosis) to remove.


ION EXCHANGE

Ion exchange involves the swapping of an undesirable ion in your water with one that has similar chemical properties, but does not have negative effects on water quality. Water softeners are the most common ion exchange systems in use in most homes. Ion exchange systems can also remove iron, manganese, nitrate and if properly designed, arsenic. An ion is any atom or compound that has either a positive (cation) or negative (anion) charge, like the poles on a magnet. A positive ion will be attracted to a negative charge in the same way the “north” pole of a magnet is attracted to the “south” pole of another magnet. The “magnet” in these systems is usually a man made polystyrene resin. The process begins with thousands of resin beads with sodium cations attached. As water passes through the resin beads, cations like iron, manganese, or calcium, knock the sodium cations off and replace them. This is possible because the sodium cations have a weaker charge. After a period of time, the available locations for this exchange to take place start to be used up. At this point the system will “regenerate” itself. A brine solution is washed over the resin beads and the billions of sodium cations in the solution force themselves back into place, removing the iron, calcium, or other cations, and flushing them into a septic system or sewer.


REVERSE OSMOSIS

The most cost-effective method for removing arsenic and many other inorganic and organic compounds from a domestic water supply appears to be reverse osmosis (RO). RO can be loosely thought of as atomic scale filtration. It works by squeezing water through a special membrane. The membrane has microscopic holes, which are specially sized to allow relatively small water molecules to pass through, while trapping larger inorganic elements like lead, iron, chromium, and arsenic or organic compounds. Studies have shown RO to be up to 95% effective at removing the most common form of arsenic routinely found in Maine well water. RO requires very little regular maintenance, no chemical addition, is very reliable, and installation is fairly straightforward. The RO system most homeowners have installed is a point of use system, designed to treat only a small amount of water daily. It is usually located near the kitchen sink, and is capable of producing two or three gallons of treated water per day. It consists of a particulate pre-filter which removes sand and grit, the membrane where the reverse osmosis occurs, and an activated carbon polishing filter to aid in taste and odor control. Treated water is stored in a small tank, and is accessed through a faucet located next to the regular kitchen faucet.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, surgeon a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, and as the drill is rotated, the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.

1576025WE OFFER THREE TYPES OF WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

There are three types of water treatment systems commonly used in private homes to treat water for a variety of contaminants: water filtration, tablets reverse osmosis and ion exchange. It may be necessary to remove a contaminant because it’s unhealthful to consume. Some examples are arsenic, one health nitrate and volatile organic compounds. Or you may want to remove something that is simply undesirable because it changes the taste of your water, order makes your water hard, or stains your clothing. Iron, manganese, calcium and magnesium are examples of aesthetic contaminants that affect some of these properties of water and that homeowners often seek to remove.


WATER FILTRATION

Water Filtration is the simplest method of treating water. Water is forced through some physical barrier, with larger particles either “sticking” to the media, or they simply can’t fit through the pore spaces in the media and are “trapped”. Activated carbon filters have tremendous surface areas for contaminants to adhere to. They are effective at removing many contaminants that change the taste and odor of water, especially organic compounds. They are also very good at removing some radioactive elements like radon and uranium. Carbon filters are not effective at removing most inorganic compounds and should not be relied upon to remove arsenic, nitrates, or other inorganics. Finally, filters should not be used to remove anything that’s dissolved in water. It was a chemical reaction that caused the contaminants to dissolve, and will likely require a chemical reaction (ion exchange) or filtration at the atomic scale (reverse osmosis) to remove.


ION EXCHANGE

Ion exchange involves the swapping of an undesirable ion in your water with one that has similar chemical properties, but does not have negative effects on water quality. Water softeners are the most common ion exchange systems in use in most homes. Ion exchange systems can also remove iron, manganese, nitrate and if properly designed, arsenic. An ion is any atom or compound that has either a positive (cation) or negative (anion) charge, like the poles on a magnet. A positive ion will be attracted to a negative charge in the same way the “north” pole of a magnet is attracted to the “south” pole of another magnet. The “magnet” in these systems is usually a man made polystyrene resin. The process begins with thousands of resin beads with sodium cations attached. As water passes through the resin beads, cations like iron, manganese, or calcium, knock the sodium cations off and replace them. This is possible because the sodium cations have a weaker charge. After a period of time, the available locations for this exchange to take place start to be used up. At this point the system will “regenerate” itself. A brine solution is washed over the resin beads and the billions of sodium cations in the solution force themselves back into place, removing the iron, calcium, or other cations, and flushing them into a septic system or sewer.


REVERSE OSMOSIS

The most cost-effective method for removing arsenic and many other inorganic and organic compounds from a domestic water supply appears to be reverse osmosis (RO). RO can be loosely thought of as atomic scale filtration. It works by squeezing water through a special membrane. The membrane has microscopic holes, which are specially sized to allow relatively small water molecules to pass through, while trapping larger inorganic elements like lead, iron, chromium, and arsenic or organic compounds. Studies have shown RO to be up to 95% effective at removing the most common form of arsenic routinely found in Maine well water. RO requires very little regular maintenance, no chemical addition, is very reliable, and installation is fairly straightforward. The RO system most homeowners have installed is a point of use system, designed to treat only a small amount of water daily. It is usually located near the kitchen sink, and is capable of producing two or three gallons of treated water per day. It consists of a particulate pre-filter which removes sand and grit, the membrane where the reverse osmosis occurs, and an activated carbon polishing filter to aid in taste and odor control. Treated water is stored in a small tank, and is accessed through a faucet located next to the regular kitchen faucet.
Netwalker Internet Services owner Nate LaClaire has successfully completed Inbound Marketing University and passed the Inbound Marketing Certification exam, remedy earning him the title of Inbound Marketing Certified Professional.

The Inbound Marketing Certification acknowledges the recipients proficiency in Inbound Marketing principals and best practices. These principles include: blogging, try
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This certification is administered by HubSpot.

Contact Nate today to learn how inbound marketing can help your business or non-profit get found by qualified prospects.

1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, surgeon a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, and as the drill is rotated, the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.

1576025WE OFFER THREE TYPES OF WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS

There are three types of water treatment systems commonly used in private homes to treat water for a variety of contaminants: water filtration, tablets reverse osmosis and ion exchange. It may be necessary to remove a contaminant because it’s unhealthful to consume. Some examples are arsenic, one health nitrate and volatile organic compounds. Or you may want to remove something that is simply undesirable because it changes the taste of your water, order makes your water hard, or stains your clothing. Iron, manganese, calcium and magnesium are examples of aesthetic contaminants that affect some of these properties of water and that homeowners often seek to remove.


WATER FILTRATION

Water Filtration is the simplest method of treating water. Water is forced through some physical barrier, with larger particles either “sticking” to the media, or they simply can’t fit through the pore spaces in the media and are “trapped”. Activated carbon filters have tremendous surface areas for contaminants to adhere to. They are effective at removing many contaminants that change the taste and odor of water, especially organic compounds. They are also very good at removing some radioactive elements like radon and uranium. Carbon filters are not effective at removing most inorganic compounds and should not be relied upon to remove arsenic, nitrates, or other inorganics. Finally, filters should not be used to remove anything that’s dissolved in water. It was a chemical reaction that caused the contaminants to dissolve, and will likely require a chemical reaction (ion exchange) or filtration at the atomic scale (reverse osmosis) to remove.


ION EXCHANGE

Ion exchange involves the swapping of an undesirable ion in your water with one that has similar chemical properties, but does not have negative effects on water quality. Water softeners are the most common ion exchange systems in use in most homes. Ion exchange systems can also remove iron, manganese, nitrate and if properly designed, arsenic. An ion is any atom or compound that has either a positive (cation) or negative (anion) charge, like the poles on a magnet. A positive ion will be attracted to a negative charge in the same way the “north” pole of a magnet is attracted to the “south” pole of another magnet. The “magnet” in these systems is usually a man made polystyrene resin. The process begins with thousands of resin beads with sodium cations attached. As water passes through the resin beads, cations like iron, manganese, or calcium, knock the sodium cations off and replace them. This is possible because the sodium cations have a weaker charge. After a period of time, the available locations for this exchange to take place start to be used up. At this point the system will “regenerate” itself. A brine solution is washed over the resin beads and the billions of sodium cations in the solution force themselves back into place, removing the iron, calcium, or other cations, and flushing them into a septic system or sewer.


REVERSE OSMOSIS

The most cost-effective method for removing arsenic and many other inorganic and organic compounds from a domestic water supply appears to be reverse osmosis (RO). RO can be loosely thought of as atomic scale filtration. It works by squeezing water through a special membrane. The membrane has microscopic holes, which are specially sized to allow relatively small water molecules to pass through, while trapping larger inorganic elements like lead, iron, chromium, and arsenic or organic compounds. Studies have shown RO to be up to 95% effective at removing the most common form of arsenic routinely found in Maine well water. RO requires very little regular maintenance, no chemical addition, is very reliable, and installation is fairly straightforward. The RO system most homeowners have installed is a point of use system, designed to treat only a small amount of water daily. It is usually located near the kitchen sink, and is capable of producing two or three gallons of treated water per day. It consists of a particulate pre-filter which removes sand and grit, the membrane where the reverse osmosis occurs, and an activated carbon polishing filter to aid in taste and odor control. Treated water is stored in a small tank, and is accessed through a faucet located next to the regular kitchen faucet.
Netwalker Internet Services owner Nate LaClaire has successfully completed Inbound Marketing University and passed the Inbound Marketing Certification exam, remedy earning him the title of Inbound Marketing Certified Professional.

The Inbound Marketing Certification acknowledges the recipients proficiency in Inbound Marketing principals and best practices. These principles include: blogging, try
social media, anorexia
lead conversion, lead nurturing, and closed-loop analysis.

In order to receive the Inbound Marketing Certification, the recipient must pass a comprehensive certification exam with a score of 75% or higher.

This certification is administered by HubSpot.

Contact Nate today to learn how inbound marketing can help your business or non-profit get found by qualified prospects.

As promised, buy information pills
we now have a new toll-free telephone number:
(866) 738-8511

Thank you for your patience as we make the change in telephone service.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, phthisiatrician
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
1527906What is it?

Hydrofracturing (or hydrofracking) is a process that may be used to increase the flow of water into a well. It is usually applied to low yielding wells. There are many instances of hydrofracturing resulting in increased yield for homeowners. The process can take place at the time a new well is constructed or it can be used at any time on an existing well with low or declining yield. It is only suitable for wells receiving their water from water moving through fractures and fissures in bedrock. The technique involves injecting high-pressure water via the drilled well into the rock formations surrounding it. Hydrofracturing may widen fractures in the bedrock and extend them further into the formation and so increase the network of water bearing fractures/ fissures supplying water to the well. Hydrofracturing was originally developed to increase oil and gas well production and has now been adopted as a technique by the water well industry. In most states, this site
hydrofracturing work can only be undertaken by a licensed or registered water well contractor.

How does it work?

The procedure involves lowering down into the well one or two inflatable hard rubber “sleeves” or “balloons” (packers as they are more correctly called). First, all pipes, wires and the pump need to be removed from the well. The packers are then inflated to seal off a section of the well. The packers are usually set a minimum of 40 feet below the end of the casing and 60 feet below ground surface. Water is pumped at high pressure into the section of the well between the packers, or below the packer if only one is used. Most hydrofracturing equipment for private wells can provide between 500 and 2000 psi pressure, sometimes up to 3,000 psi (pounds per square inch). Up to 50 gallons a minute is usually adequate as a pumping rate for adding water into the well. The water pressure within the sealed-off section of the well will rise as the surrounding rocks resist the flow of water out of the well. A sign of successful hydrofracturing is a sudden drop in the pressure indicating that the surrounding rocks are accepting water. If more fissures have been opened there is often a strong backflow of turbid water when pumping into the well is stopped. The cost for single packer hydrofracturing is usually less than when a double packer system is used. A double system allows for a selected zone in the well to be pressured by inflating both packers. The packers are usually first set near the bottom of the well and then moved up to another section. Selection of the zones to pressurize may be made from information on the well drillers log or from a down-hole camera survey.

Points for a well owner to note about the hydrofracturing process:

* There may be permit and reporting requirements for hydrofracturing. Well contractors who specialize in hydrofracturing services will know whether “paperwork” is required.

* In order to assess the effectiveness of the hydrofracturing process the contractor will usually perform a “before & after” test of the well yield.

* There is the potential for the hydrofracturing process to temporarily influence water levels or turbidity in a close-by neighboring well if the two wells share some of the same fractures.

* There have been instances where packers set too close to the surface have caused a breakout of water above ground.

* The contractor should use high-quality water (and/or water pumped in advance from the well to be pressurized) for the hydrofracturing process to avoid introducing any contaminants into the aquifer.

* After hydrofracturing, the contractor will normally purge the well of fine material but there could be some cloudiness in the water for a few days.

* The use of high-pressure equipment is potentially dangerous and homeowners should stay away from the wellhead when the hydrofracturing equipment is pressurized.

* It is normal practice to sanitize a well after any maintenance or well development work. You may have to wait 24 hours before the well can be put back into use. The beneficial effects of hydrofracturing should be permanent, and usually achieve a satisfactory water yield for less cost than drilling a new well. With more and more well contractors possessing the equipment necessary for hydrofracture, the process is becoming routine for areas where there are typically low yielding wells in bedrock.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, disorder
a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, medstore
and as the drill is rotated, emergency
the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prevents insects or any other critters from getting into the well). The industry standard is just a regular cap.

At A-Z Water we are a full-service water company that takes pride in being able to service a job from the beginning to the very end.
A-Z Water Systems is a full service water company specializing in “out of water” calls and water filtration. We do everything from drilling your well to making sure your drinking water is clean and safe. We treat your water as if we were giving it to our own children.

Carl Levesque, neurologist
the owner, has been in the water industry since 1986. With over 25 years of experience he has gained the knowledge and ability needed to tackle any water problem.

Over the past several years, A-Z Water has become the go to company for many plumbers. They know they can rest assured that their customers will be well taken care of on any water pump or filtration needs.

At A-Z Water we not only pride ourselves in customer service, but customer satisfaction as well. When we leave we want you to be happy and know that the job was done right.

Many people don’t realize the importance of water until they wake up one morning and they don’t have any! Immediately they begin to wonder who do I call? Figuring this out can be a time consuming and scary task. Don’t let this happen to you!

Let A-Z be on standby for you. Rest assured and know that you can count on us anytime when something goes wrong with your water.

 
Q: How long do water pumps last?
A: Water Pumps generally last between 10-15 years.

Q: How can I tell if my water tank is working properly?
A: A properly working water tank should be able to cycle your water pump for a minimum of 30 seconds. To determine this, and
have someone turn on a water faucet and stand by the water tank, for sale
when you hear a click, order time how long it takes before it clicks again & that is your total time. Anything less than 30 seconds indicates your tank needs to be serviced. If you here a rapid clicking sound that means your water tank has a ruptured bladder and needs to be replaced immediately. Not replacing your tank will cause permanent damage to your water pump.

Q: What should I do if the water stops working?
A: If you notice the water has stopped working go to your circuit breaker panel and turn the water pump breaker to the off position. Then call us to come diagnose the problem.
7234624Most wells in Maine use the rotary drilling method, surgeon a drill bit is attached to a length of connected drill pipe. The drill bit is made of tough metals such as tungsten, and as the drill is rotated, the bit acts to grind up the rock. The broken pieces (cuttings) are flushed upward and out of the hole by circulating a drilling fluid (sometimes called drilling mud) down through the drill pipe and back to the surface. This drilling fluid also serves to cool and lubricate the drill bit, and by stabilizing the wall of the hole, it can prevent possible cave-in of unstable sands or crumbly rock before the well casing or well screen is installed. As the drill intersects water-bearing rock formations water will flow into the hole. We carefully monitor the depth of water “strikes” and keep a note of the formations in which they occur. In areas of hard rocks we use a well drilling technique that uses compressed air to operate a down-hole air hammer on the end of the drill string that helps to break up the hard rocks. The compressed air also blows the crushed rock fragments out of the hole to the surface along with any water that flows in the well during drilling. In low yielding wells it is sometimes possible to increase yield by using “hydrofrac” techniques. In this process, selected parts of the drilled hole are subjected to great pressure using special tools lowered from the surface. The expected result is that small existing fractures will be enlarged or opened up to allow the well to connect to additional water bearing fractures or fissures. No matter which method of drilling is used, the top part of the well is usually lined with steel or plastic well casing. The diameter of the drilled hole is usually an inch or two wider than the diameter of the casing. The space between the drilled hole and the casing (the annulus) has to be filled to prevent the chance of polluted surface water from migrating downward along the outside of the casing where it might contaminate the aquifer. Sometimes most of the space is filled with the fine rock pieces from drilling and then the top 20 feet is grouted. A modern water well is much more than a hole in the ground.

A-Z Water Systems Recommended Flow Rates

Flow Rates: 100 ft = 6 gal/min, 140 ft = 5 gal/min, 180 ft = 4gal/min, 240 ft = 3 gal/min, 320 ft = 2 gal/min, 420 ft = 1 gal/min

A-Z Water uses higher flow rates then normal state standards

9 reasons why to use A-Z Water Systems

With A-Z Water Systems, you get much more than just a company that drills water wells and installs water pumps.

Benefits

  1. On-Time Scheduling
  2. Increased Flow rates above state standards
  3. Proper sizing of water pumps & tanks (This ensures your water needs are met)
  4. Water Testing (With A-Z Water the job does not end with the water pump. We fully chlorinate the well and pump and then take a water sample and send it to the lab for analysis. We then provide a copy for you with any recommendations and pricing on any filtration that might be needed if necessary).
  5. Upgradable systems (A-Z Water offers constant pressure systems for those customers who would like additional water pressure without the fluctuation that accompanies a traditional system).
  6. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements for FHA regulations
  7. Ability to handle and knowledge of water requirements and pumping systems for houses that require fire sprinkler systems without having to install space consuming holding tanks in the basement.
  8. Use of materials above industry standards
  9. Varmint Proof Well caps (Prev